Infographic: Portrait of a CEO

 

Takeaway

  • In the United States, the average CEO assumes the role at age 50.8.
  • CEOs from "high-discretion" countries, like the U.S., are much more likely to be dismissed following poor firm performance than CEOs in "low-discretion" countries. 
  • The incidence of psychopathy amoung CEOs is about 4 percent, four times what it is in the general population.

There may be nothing typical about individuals who become chief executives, but as data and research show, but there are commonalities to be found among the men and women who carry the CEO title.

Below, a collection of government data and research from McCombs professors, including Craig Crossland, Robert Parrino, and Raji Srinivasan, that paints a portrait of what makes a CEO.

Enlarge the image or click its thumbnail at right to download.

Infographic: Portrait of a CEO

Faculty in this Article

Craig Crossland

Assistant Professor of Management McCombs School of Business, The University of Texas at Austin

Craig R. Crossland, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Management, at the McCombs School of Business, The University of Texas at...

Raji Srinivasan

Associate Professor of Marketing McCombs School of Business, The University of Texas at Austin

Raji Srinivasan's main areas of expertise are in organizational innovation and marketing metrics. Organizational innovation includes new product...

Robert Parrino

Lamar Savings Centennial Professor of Finance McCombs School of Business, The University of Texas at Austin

Robert Parrino, the Lamar Savings Centennial Professor of Finance and director of the Hicks, Muse, Tate & Furst Center for Private Equity...

About The Author

Jeremy Simon

Writer, McCombs School of Business

As a writer for Texas Enterprise, Jeremy covers business-related research and news from the University of Texas at Austin. In addition, he manages...

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